Wednesday, February 21, 2024

International Plant Propagation Society

Advanced Wollemi Pines ready for transplanting from cutting propagation (image supplied by Matt Coulter)
International Plant Propagation Society

Propagation to save the Wollemi Pine

By Matt Coulter

Wollemia nobilis is listed by the IUCN (International Union for the Conservation of Nature) as a critically endangered tree species. The species is commonly known as Wollemi Pine and is, in fact, not a pine but a member of a 200-million-year-old plant family, the Araucariaceae, predominately a southern hemisphere plant family that includes Araucaria, Agathis, and the monotypic genus Wollemia.Continue reading

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The difference in growth caused by the abrasive nature of tuff compared with perlite in a coir blend (Image: Dan Austin)
International Plant Propagation Society

Preformed plugs or a conventional cutting mix?

By Dan Austin

When it comes to plant propagation there are a few key areas to achieve production success. When growing maximum numbers in minimal space, quality, uniformity, and speed all come into play and they are all influenced by one thing – growing media.Continue reading

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Cottonwood flower (Hibiscus tiliaceus) (Image: Dan Austin)
International Plant Propagation Society

Rethinking the humble hedge

By Dan Austin

In Australia, we are spoiled for choice when it comes to the plants available for our gardens. Garden centres offer up a myriad of options for just about any purpose, but the popularity of a handful of favourites still leads to some species being overused and causing a sense of horticultural déjà vu when travelling around the country.Continue reading

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The world’s largest plant is a sea grass Posidonia australis (Image: Rachel Austin, University of Western Australia)
International Plant Propagation Society

Plants that have rewritten the record books

By Daniel Austin

The kingdom of plants is a big one, each member is a standout and potential record holder if you dig deep enough. Even something as seemingly obvious as the world’s largest plant hasn’t been as straightforward as it might have seemed.Continue reading

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The tiny leaf of a tissue-cultured raspberry (Image: Lisa Wightwick)
International Plant Propagation Society

An insight into plant tissue culture

By Lisa Wightwick

Many members of our industry would have encountered ‘tissue culture’ or ‘TC’ at least once in the course of their careers. I’m usually met with fascination when I tell people I work in plant tissue culture, due, in part, to the mysterious and technical reputation the field seems to have garnered.Continue reading

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Brice Higgs presenting the Rod Tallis Award to Elliot Akintola, pictured with his wife Joana
International Plant Propagation Society

Propagation – essential to life

By Karen Smith

The 51st conference of the International Plant Propagators Society (IPPS) held recently at the Novotel, Geelong in Victoria was awash with the enthusiasm of up-and-coming horticulturists ready to take advantage of the seek and share attitude that is the society’s main purpose.Continue reading

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Plants grown in tissue culture can be induced to produce roots or shoots using auxins and cytokinins
International Plant Propagation Society

Phytohormones – an important list that keeps getting longer

By Dan Austin

When talking about plant hormones there are five big players that get exposure, but over the years, it has been discovered that there are many more and the roles they play within plants are nothing short of extraordinary.Continue reading

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Westland Nurseries Open Day at Seven Mile Beach, Tasmania (Image: IPPS)
International Plant Propagation Society

Celebrating 50 years of IPPS

By Dan Austin

Seeking and sharing knowledge of plant production is the core principle of the International Plant Propagators’ Society (IPPS). In recent months, this ethos has been showcased like never before as members across the country opened their doors to present propagation at its best through a series of regional meetings in celebration of fifty successful years of the society.Continue reading

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The new propagation facility is designed to maximise light
International Plant Propagation Society

Advancing training in propagation

By Dan Austin

It is an uncertain time for the future of many industries, horticulture included. As the greats of old, age and retire, quality training is needed like never before. So, in an industry that is increasingly moving online, it is fantastic when training providers invest in much-needed material assets.Continue reading

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Prolific and viable fruit set of box elder (Acer negundo)
International Plant Propagation Society

Jumping the garden fence: when wonders become weeds

By Dan Austin

Whether it is through an ability to adapt to a wide range of environments, ingenious methods of seed dispersal or multiple methods for reproduction, in nature, plants are constantly vying to outcompete surrounding flora. When successful, these plants become champions for their species, but for humans, they achieve a different title – weeds.Continue reading

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A fallen branch wound is only one step in the creation of nesting hollows that may take over one hundred years to form
International Plant Propagation Society

The true value of trees in our landscape

By Dan Austin

There is nothing so lonesome, morbid or drear, than to stand with a view of a landscape with no trees. It doesn’t quite have the same ring to it as the Slim Dusty classic “Pub with no beer” but the sentiment is spot on.Continue reading

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Developing fruit of a pomegranate (Punica granatum)
International Plant Propagation Society

Crops of the future: Fresh produce for a changing climate

By Dan Austin

For many of us, the arrival of 2023 presented an exciting opportunity to celebrate, after a lengthy period mired by COVID19, and hopefully, a chance to recharge for the year ahead. However, while clearing pandemic clouds and a new year have been cause for celebration, the horticultural world continues to face numerous challenges.Continue reading

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Modern greenhouse technology allows students to achieve industry currency
International Plant Propagation Society

Educational greenhouses offer a positive step for a skilled industry

By Daniel Austin

Vocational Education and Training (VET) is seen in all sorts of shapes and forms across Australia, from traditional Technical and Further Education (TAFE) colleges to private Registered Training Organisations (RTOs) and a myriad of online training options. So why is it that today, quality horticultural staff are so hard to come by?Continue reading

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Eucalyptus means well covered and describes the plants’ developing flowers
International Plant Propagation Society

Understanding botanical nomenclature

By Dan Austin

Like many fields, a career in horticulture brings with it the need to learn a whole new language. Whether it is our range of industry-specific tools, plant cultural techniques or botanical terminology, there’s no way around it – without a good grasp of professional language, you’re likely to run into trouble.Continue reading

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Eastern Queen of Sheba (Thelymitra speciosa) Borden, Western Australia
International Plant Propagation Society

Saving the Queen of Sheba, a conservation success story

By Dan Austin

As one of the most biodiverse locations on the planet, the South Western Australian Floristic Region draws in plant enthusiasts from across the nation, and the world, for a chance to glimpse something special from the area’s extraordinary botanical palette.Continue reading

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A compromised wound on a budded tree with receding vascular tissue and soft decay
International Plant Propagation Society

Inspecting your investment – what to look for when buying trees

By Dan Austin

For most landscaping projects, the most significant costs regarding living elements are those incurred through the inclusion of established ornamental trees, and rightly so, because when buying established trees, we are buying time as well as a plant,

With such costs surrounding the purchase of nursery-grown trees, it’s worth taking the time to inspect your investment to ensure you are going to get value for your money for decades into the future.… Continue reading

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Seedless ‘Cavendish’ bananas account for most of the world’s banana production
International Plant Propagation Society

Parthenogenesis – the phenomenon that changed our groceries

By Daniel Austin

It’s a process that can influence your garden in all sorts of ways, from the appearance of fruit to the impact of the irksome aphid, but what is parthenogenesis?

In simple terms, parthenogenesis is the spontaneous development of an embryo without fertilisation, and it occurs widely in both the plant and animal kingdoms.… Continue reading

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John Bunker presents Gabe Mostafa with the Edward and Mary Bunker award
International Plant Propagation Society

Looking back, looking forward with IPPS

By Karen Smith

Fifty years after the first meeting of plant propagators under the banner of the International Plant Propagators Society, the IPPS returned to the Blue Mountains in NSW to celebrate the ongoing success of the society. The two years since the last conference did nothing to lessen the camaraderie and goodwill shared between members.Continue reading

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