Wednesday, April 17, 2024

Botanic Gardens

Horticulturist Ryan Underhill working with the Pyrus trees which were planted to provide shade for the seating area (Image: Leonie Scriven)
Botanic Gardens

Partnering to give the gift of Mediterranean climate plants

By Dr Leonie Scriven and Emily Drewniak

The revitalisation of the Adelaide Botanic Garden Mediterranean Climate Garden represents an exciting new garden partnership. It unites the expertise of South Australia’s horticultural and landscape professionals. The dedication and experience of garden volunteers, enabled by community philanthropy and corporate support, has delivered a novel landscape which inspires visitors to grow and appreciate Mediterranean climate plants.Continue reading

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Windrows of recently removed African olive branches to reduce water and leaf litter loss
Botanic Gardens

Return of the Western Sydney Dry Rainforest

By Michael Elgey

For millennia, the lands in Western Sydney where the Australian Botanic Garden Mount Annan (ABGMA) is located, were home to the First Nations people of the Dharawal Nation. This site was also a meeting place for the Dharug and Gandangara nations, where these three nations met to trade and discuss law and other matters.Continue reading

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Flowers of Agonis flexuosa (Image: Emily Denham)
Botanic Gardens

Seed collections help safeguard the future

By Matthew Stray

While Agonis flexuosa may appear robust and resilient, this long-lived species should not be taken for granted, nor should access to its seed. Threats to A. flexuosa exist through the processes of climate change as well as a potential incursion of Myrtle Rust into south west Western Australia.Continue reading

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A selection of Tasmania’s native Ericaceae
Botanic Gardens

Seed dormancy issues of native Ericaceae

by James Wood

The propagation of plants can be performed vegetatively or with seed. In many circumstances vegetative propagation is essential to achieve immediate conservation outcomes, but if you want to achieve genetically diverse outcomes germinating seed is generally preferable. When it comes to the functioning of seed banks, germination is also important.Continue reading

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The Tiny Forest in August 2023 (Image: Wollongong Botanic Gardens)
Botanic Gardens

Small but mighty – Tiny Forests

By Felicity Skoberne

Urban greening through planting trees in public spaces can often be challenging and draw a wide range of responses from the community. Wollongong City Council recently refreshed their urban greening approaches by engaging with the community to construct rapid growth forests.Continue reading

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Omeo Storks-bill seeds photographed in the National Seed Bank (Image: John Fitz Gerald)
Botanic Gardens

The Rare Bloom Project – building horticultural knowledge for conservation

By Zoe Knapp and Amelia Stevens

The Rare Bloom Project™ is a three-year program delivered through a partnership between Botanica by Air Wick and the World Wide Fund for Nature Australia (WWF) in collaboration with the Australian Seed Bank Partnership (ASBP). It aims to improve conservation outcomes for 120 Australian native wildflowers from fire-affected areas through seed banking, germination research and restoration.Continue reading

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Capricorn catchments group discussing planting techniques
Botanic Gardens

Bringing Nature Back: Yeppen Lagoon – Riparian Restoration Projects, Rockhampton Botanic Garden

By Stuart Elder

Yeppen Yeppen (now known as the Yeppen Lagoon) is located at the gateway to Rockhampton City, Central Queensland on Darumbal Country. Situated on the Fitzroy River floodplain, the Lagoon links directly to the Great Barrier Reef catchment. Recognised as Rockhampton’s first town water supply in 1861, the Lagoon continues to play a key role in our community today, providing a picturesque backdrop for a popular walking, running, cycling, fishing and birdwatching area.Continue reading

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Inside the Bonsai House Gallery
Botanic Gardens

New Bonsai House for Brisbane Botanic Gardens

By Dale Arvidsson and Perry Naumann

All images supplied by Brisbane Botanic Gardens Mt Coot-tha

Brisbane Botanic Gardens Mt Coot-tha is Queensland’s premier subtropical botanic gardens and features a variety of spectacular living collections. Many of these themed displays feature categories ranging from geographic to climatic, and conservation to amenity horticulture, which are both educational and inspirational for the Garden’s million-plus visitors annually.Continue reading

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The Water Treatment Plant holding and irrigation tanks (images supplied by Royal Botanic Gardens, Cranbourne)
Botanic Gardens

Water security in the Australian Garden, Royal Botanic Gardens Cranbourne

By Trent Loane and Mitchell Burns

The Australian Garden is an inspiring and immersive display of Australian flora, landscapes, art, and architecture. The garden places a focus on sustainable horticultural practices and the conservation of south-east Australian flora. Set across 15ha, the Australian Garden follows a metaphorical journey of water from the arid inland landscapes of central Australia, along dry riverbeds and down mighty rivers, to the coastal fringes of the continent.Continue reading

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Your team hold within them years of experience, here are some key themes our team produced. (Image: Words generated by https://monkeylearn.com/word-cloud/)
Botanic Gardens

A roadmap to achieving horticultural excellence

By Barbara Wheeler

Achieving excellence in growing and cultivating plants and gardens is an intrinsic part of each of our organisations, whether big or small. The technical aspects of good horticultural practice and horticultural excellence are intimately understood by experienced staff in our businesses, and frequently passed on verbally to newcomers.Continue reading

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The spectacular colour and leaf details of the majestic Encephalartos horridus growing in the living collection of the Royal Botanic Garden Sydney, Australia (Image supplied by Royal Botanic Gardens Sydney)
Botanic Gardens

Saving cycads from extinction in botanic gardens

By James A. R. Clugston and Scott Yates

Cycads are a charismatic group of plants with a lineage that dates back more than 250 million years. With around 370 currently recognised species in 10 genera split between two families (Cycadaceae and Zamiaceae), they are diverse and have a strong pantropical distribution.Continue reading

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ABG wetland holding pond 2023
Botanic Gardens

Reflecting on the Adelaide Botanic Garden Wetlands

By Dr Leonie J. Scriven

Water is a precious resource and vital to any successful horticultural venture. The Adelaide Botanic Garden had the vision and opportunity to diversify its potential water sources used to irrigate its living collection. Through the creation and development of a managed aquifer storage and recovery system, the botanic gardens can now use groundwater to irrigate the botanic gardens and has, in addition, created a wetland habitat used for teaching and horticultural training.Continue reading

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Architectural landmark – the Tropicarium at University of Tübingen Botanic Garden
Botanic Gardens

Old gardens underpin new science

Words and images supplied By John Fitzsimmons

Botanic gardens are museums of living plants where botanists and horticulturists work together. Understandably, many of the world’s oldest and most respected botanic gardens began in association with places of learning – universities, churches, and under the patronage of wealthy benefactors.Continue reading

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PSHB Beetles are less than 2mm in length, about the size of a sesame seed
Botanic Gardens

PSHB – the perfect invader

By Chelsea Payne

Polyphagous Shot Hole Borer (PSHB) has emerged as a significant tree pest in Perth, Western Australia, and presents a threat to Australia’s incredible native flora, and our thriving horticulture and agriculture industries.

Described as the ‘perfect invader,’ the Polyphagous Shot Hole Borer beetle Euwallaceae fornicatus tunnels into living host trees and shrubs creating extensive galleries within structural stems.… Continue reading

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Community plantings (Image: ABGMA)
Botanic Gardens

Greening our Garden

Returning 40 hectares of native canopy at Australia’s largest Botanic Garden

By Michael Elgey

In 2019 the Australian Botanic Garden Mount Annan (ABGMA) secured NSW State Government grant funding as part of the Greening Our City initiative. Our successful proposal was to plant 22,500 native trees and return a canopy that was unfortunately cleared during European colonisation.Continue reading

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The Global Botanic Gardens congress was well attended
Botanic Gardens

Agents of change

By Maraika vanWessem

To the public, our botanic gardens are places of solace, learning and socialising. But what about the bigger picture? More than two thirds of our global population will be living in cities by 2050, yet the trees that shade and make those cities liveable are under increasing threat.Continue reading

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Grey skies won’t dampen these new plantings.
Botanic Gardens

In pursuit of an organic display Rose Garden

By Tristan O’Hara

For many years, the Royal Botanic Garden Sydney (RBG) has been working towards providing a high-quality, organic, display Rose Garden under challenging circumstances.

Upfront, I am a general horticulturist, not an expert rosarian and have been entrusted with managing the RBG’s Rose Garden.… Continue reading

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The Steamy Wonder for weed managements (Image: ANBG)
Botanic Gardens

Creative approaches to weed and pest management

By Zoe Knapp

Managing plant pests and weeds is an important component of curating any botanic garden. Like many botanic gardens, the Australian National Botanic Gardens applies an Integrated Pest Management approach to minimise herbicide and pesticide use on site.

In recent years, increased rainfall and milder climate conditions, combined with pandemic restrictions and reduced on-site staffing, have increased our need for creative solutions to pest and weed management.… Continue reading

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Swainsona formosa in full flower at Adelaide Botanic Garden (Image: Matt Coulter)
Botanic Gardens

Desert Pea – an arid land beauty

By Matt Coulter

As the state’s floral emblem, Swainsona formosa,the Sturt’s Desert Pea is an important species for the Botanic Gardens and State Herbarium of South Australia to showcase in our collections. 

Swainsona formosa, the Sturt’s Desert Pea, was one of the first plants of Australia to be collected by European explorers.… Continue reading

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Friends of the Gardens preparing for the Visitors Centre Botanic Gardens Open Day
Botanic Gardens

Friends of the Gardens – the lifeblood of Rockhampton Botanic Garden

By Stuart Elder

In my first days as Curator at Rockhampton Botanic Garden last September, I was struck with a very welcoming and familiar sight dressed in bright pink shirts, the Friends of the Botanic Gardens!

Having worked for many years in various roles for The Royal Botanic Gardens and Domain Trust, I was very familiar with the various programs that were run under the Foundation and Friends Inc.… Continue reading

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